Washington CAN! and Councilmembers Sawant, Herbold, O’Brien unveil move­in fee cap legislation Seattle, WA

0
659

Council Members from left Lisa Herbold, Mike Obrien, and Kshama Sawant at the press conference. Photo by Runta News

— A variety of community and labor organizations joined Washington Community Action Network and 

Councilmembers Kshama Sawant, Lisa Herbold, and Mike O’Brien to unveil both Seattle’s Renting Crisis: A Report and Policy Recommendations as well as legislation to cap move­in fees. Washington CAN!’s report revealed marginalized communities are disproportionately impacted by unaffordable rent, landlord retaliation, unhealthy housing  conditions, and the various barriers to accessing housing.  In the report, one of the biggest barriers to accessing housing is the high upfront costs (security deposit, last month’s rent, first month’s rent, and nonrefundable fees) many landlords require tenants to pay at move­in. “I receive Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Insurance, a total of $752 a month. With rents as high as they are, I do not have the ability to save for these high upfront costs ­ which would easily be several thousand dollars. I have to move in March, and because of the high rent and upfront costs common in Seattle, I do not know what I’m going to do if legislative steps to remedy this problem are not taken,” said Meagan Murphy, member of Washington CAN!  Councilmember Sawant’s legislation, 

crafted with input from Washington CAN!, would require  move­in fees (security deposit and nonrefundable fees combined) to be no more than the cost of  one month’s rent. In addition, landlords would be 

required to accept a payment plan of up to six months for move­in fees and last month’s rent.  “Seattle’s renters are facing a serious crisis. In May, one­bedroom apartment rents rose 11%, the highest increase in the nation. As we fight for rent control, we need to reduce all barriers faced by renters. The cost of moving into a rental unit is first on that list,” Sawant said.  Both Councilmember Herbold and Councilmember O’Brien support this legislation.  “Low­income individuals and families across the city continue to struggle to find housing and move­in costs pose a barrier to many tenants who are barely making ends meet. This legislation will help address this barrier by lowering up­front costs to Seattle renters. Thanks to Washington CAN! and Councilmember Sawant for bringing this forward,” O’Brien said.   A variety of labor and community organizations support this legislation as well.  “Low­income women, particularly women with children, are especially vulnerable to predatory landlords who charge exorbitant fees to access housing. Excessive move­in costs can make housing prohibitively expensive, and present yet another barrier to women who already face hurdles when trying to access basic health care, including reproductive health care. Women are more  likely to be poor, more likely to be raising children alone, and more likely to face barriers to  housing access, which is why NARAL Pro­Choice Washington supports this proposal to make  housing more accessible to all Seattle residents,” said Rachel Berkson, Executive Director of  NARAL Pro­Choice Washington.   Monica Cortes Viharo, UAW Local 4121 Executive Board member says, “Our members (student workers at the University of Washington) 

really struggle with housing affordability. We see this issue as vital to our members’ interests and to addressing a broader need to make Seattle livable for all low­wage workers.” Several other organizations attended the press conference to show their support for the legislation (SEIU Local 6, SEIU 1199, Transit Riders Union, Tenants Union, Gender Justice League, Wa-shington Student Association, UAW Local 4121, UFCW Local 21, Seattle Education Association, and others).  The legislation will be introduced in the coming weeks. Washington CAN! will continue to push  for both this legislation and the policy recommendations 

ou-tlined in their report. 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here